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Transistor

transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify or switch electronic signals and electrical power. It is composed of semiconductor material usually with at least three terminals for connection to an external circuit. A voltage or current applied to one pair of the transistor’s terminals controls the current through another pair of terminals.

Because the controlled (output) power can be higher than the controlling (input) power, a transistor can amplify a signal. Today, some transistors are packaged individually, but many more are found embedded in integrated circuits.

The transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices, and is ubiquitous in modern electronic systems. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld patented a field-effect transistor in 1926 but it was not possible to actually construct a working device at that time. The first practically implemented device was a point-contact transistor invented in 1947 by American physicists John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley. The transistor revolutionized the field of electronics, and paved the way for smaller and cheaper radios, calculators, and computers, among other things. The transistor is on the list of IEEE milestones in electronics,  and Bardeen, Brattain, and Shockley shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics for their achievement.

Most transistors are made from very pure silicon or germanium, but certain other semiconductor materials can also be used. A transistor may have only one kind of charge carrier, in a field effect transistor, or may have two kinds of charge carriers in bipolar junction transistor devices. Compared with the vacuum tube, transistors are generally smaller, and require less power to operate. Certain vacuum tubes have advantages over transistors at very high operating frequencies or high operating voltages. Many types of transistors are made to standardized specifications by multiple manufacturers.

Transistors are categorized by

  • semiconductor material: the metalloids germanium (first used in 1947) and silicon (first used in 1954)—in amorphous, polycrystalline and monocrystalline form—, the compounds gallium arsenide (1966) and silicon carbide (1997), the alloy silicon-germanium (1989), the allotrope of carbon graphene (research ongoing since 2004), etc. (see Semiconductor material);
  • structure: BJT, JFET, IGFET (MOSFET), insulated-gate bipolar transistor, “other types”;
  • electrical polarity (positive and negative): n–p–n, p–n–p (BJTs), n-channel, p-channel (FETs);
  • maximum power rating: low, medium, high;
  • maximum operating frequency: low, medium, high, radio (RF), microwave frequency (the maximum effective frequency of a transistor in a common-emitter or common-source circuit is denoted by the term fT, an abbreviation for transition frequency—the frequency of transition is the frequency at which the transistor yields unity voltage gain)
  • application: switch, general purpose, audio, high voltage, super-beta, matched pair;
  • physical packaging: through-hole metal, through-hole plastic, surface mount, ball grid array, power modules (see Packaging);
  • amplification factor hFEβF (transistor beta)[43] or gm (transconductance).

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